Busy bee

17 04 2012

Spring is a big deal, especially for pollinators like bees. This little guy – a bumble bee – is hard at work on an azalea bush. If you look closely, you can see its proboscis pointing down toward the flower’s center.





1,000 words, image ten

2 04 2012

(Tenth in a series of eventually 1,000 images).

It’s said that a picture is worth a thousand words. What do you see here? Think of the saying “April _____ brings May flowers.”

These are drops of rain on a leaf. The monochromatic, high contrast scheme adds dimension to the drops; they almost appear to be moving away from the center of the leaf.





Coming out of the shadows

29 03 2012

The showy bursts of color from spring and summer wildflowers are always attention-getting. It’s usually the bright colors against a cloudless blue sky or filling a huge field that grab you. In this case, the flowers were hillside and not yet fully visible because the sun was just peeking over the top of the hill.

Image

In the shadows the bright yellow flowers are visible as dots while the darker purple ones are at their best in the sun. And there in the full sun is a white Angelica plant, which is a member of the carrot family. It’s literally coming out of the shadows to greet the day.

Photographed at Seljalandsfoss, a waterfall that drops nearly 200 feet. The waterfall is in southwest Iceland, near Reykjavik.





1,000 words, image nine

28 03 2012

(Ninth in a series of eventually 1,000 images).

The beauty of the butterfly. This Malachite butterfly (found the name via Flickr) is doing the busy and necessary work of pollinating flowers.

Green & black butterfly

Short-lived though they are, butterflies evoke a sense of peace and serenity when we see them. It’s a free mental health benefit courtesy of Mother Nature.





The Ides of March: don’t beware, be nice

15 03 2012

“Beware the Ides of March” is a well-known Shakespearean quote from Julius Caesar. Although “Ides” was the ancient Roman way of signifying the middle of the month (reference), the connection to Caesar’s assassination and that one word – “beware” – give it an ominous tone and may bring a sense of foreboding.

The pleasant bit of graffiti below was found on the streets of another ancient city, Athens, Greece. On a day when people commonly think “beware,” isn’t it preferable to “be nice” instead?

Be nice








<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: